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  • Canada and Denmark wage the strangest war in the history of mankind In the middle of the Nersa Strait, which separates Greenland and the Canadian province of Nunavut, Hans Island rises. The island’s area is only 1.3 square kilometers, it is uninhabited, there are no trees and there is practically no soil. It would seem, well, let him rise to himself, to whom he, in fact, surrendered. But no, this island has been the scene of an international conflict for almost half a century. In practice, it looks like this. Once a few months, Canadian navy sailors disembark on Hans Island, they drop the flag of Denmark, hang their own and leave a bottle of whiskey. Then the Danes appear, repeat the procedure, pick up the whiskey and leave their bottle.Therefore, this strange conflict was dubbed the whiskey war. The exact location of the island of Hans was described by researchers in the 20s of the last century. It turned out that it is located strictly in the middle of the Ners Strait, 35 kilometers wide. What creates an entertaining precedent in terms of international law. According to the law, the boundary of territorial waters passes 12 miles (22.2 kilometers) from the coast. Consequently, the island of Hans falls into both Canadian and Danish (Greenland belongs to Denmark) territorial waters. In 1933, the issue was raised at a meeting of the Permanent Chamber of International Justice (judicial organ of the League of Nations). As a result, the island gave Denmark. However, due to the remoteness of the disputed territory and the subsequent collapse of the League of Nations, this decision soon lost both practical and legal force. In the 1970s, the two countries recognized each other’s claims on the continental shelf and even drew the maritime boundary approaching the island north and south, but the status of the island itself could not agree. However, due to the presence of more pressing foreign policy issues, both sides for a long time forgot about the existenceof the dispute. So far in 2004, the Canadian parliament did not use the conflict around the island of Hans as a pretext for increasing defense spending. Canadian troops arrived on a poor island, erected a stone sculpture and raised a flag. What caused the stormy indignation of the Danish side. Since then, the debate has not subsided. Expeditions of both countries alternately dismantle the flags and monuments of the enemy and build their own. But at the same time they do not lose their sense of humor and leave gifts. Danish soldiers always leave a bottle of schnapps on the island. Canadians, for their part, also maintain a cheerful tradition - after them we find a bottle of whiskey and a sign Welcome to Canada, - writes the head of the international law section of the Danish Foreign Ministry, Peter Takso Jensen. Danish-Canadian relations
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